Entertainment Wrap Up
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NOVEMBER 11, 2013
Sorry doesn't cut it unless you are really, really forced into it

Last month on my syndicated radio shows I talked about a sketch called Kids Table on Jimmy Kimmel’s late-night program.

On the ABC show, a kid suggested killing the Chinese as a way to deal with the U.S. debt. It was deemed as an offensive joke at the time – in October – and seemingly went away after a bit of complaining from international groups… or so we thought.

This month protests continued despite Kimmel himself giving an apology earlier in November.

Protesters are saying it was a fake apology and are calling for a boycott of Kimmel’s late-night talk show and taking ABC's parent company Disney to task.

Throughout the country Kimmel and ABC were protested against for their alleged racism, though it wasn't even Kimmel who made the joke, but protesters are saying the segment should never have run in the first place. For its part, ABC previously apologized for offending people and said the segment wouldn't air in any repeats or other distribution channels.

Several hundred protesters in Houston took to the streets firing back at what they called a fake apology and ABC's alleged racism. They were also calling for Kimmel to be fired.

The protesters were also encouraging a boycott of ABC, presumably in the hopes of affecting its advertising revenue during the lucrative sweeps period when commercial time is at a premium so it could result in a major loss of revenue.

While it is yet to be seen if ABC will respond to the nationwide -- though admittedly, small-scale protests – there is a petition that has made its way to the White House.

The White House has a We the People petition with over 103,000 signatures simply wanting a "sincere apology" from Kimmel. Since he already has said he's sorry, it is unclear why people think he didn't mean it and how it could actually be deemed sincere when his hand would be forced into making a scripted network-approved apology.